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Cancer Health Main Forums => Cancer Research News & Studies => Topic started by: danialthomas on October 03, 2020, 01:13:27 pm

Title: Improving Intravenous Vitamin C
Post by: danialthomas on October 03, 2020, 01:13:27 pm

Done properly, intravenous vitamin C can function as a stand-alone chemotherapeutic agent. As I mentioned in a previous post, we use sodium ascorbate (not ascorbic acid) that is augmented with intravenous artesunate, azithromycin, calcium chloride, doxycycline, magnesium chloride, potassium chloride, along with oral copper, iron, and sulindac. Artesunate, copper, iron, and sulindac potentiate (amplify) the pro-oxidative, cytotoxic, anti-cancer effects of vitamin C. The addition of azithromycin and doxycycline targets cancer stem cells. And the addition of calcium chloride, magnesium chloride, and potassium chloride prevents electrolyte imbalances during treatment. To further potentiate the pro-oxidative, cytotoxic, anti-cancer effects of vitamin C, we have recently begun adding intravenous epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and oral piperlongumine.
Poor tumor blood perfusion and tumor hypoxia are common problems that limit the effectiveness of both conventional and alternative cancer therapy. The level of intratumoral blood flow and oxygenation may be the most important limiting factors in the anticancer effect of high-dose intravenous vitamin C. Intravenous ozone has recently been found to safely increase blood perfusion in dense tumor tissue and reduce tumor hypoxia by increasing intratumoral oxygen partial pressure. Based on this new information, prior to the infusion of vitamin C, we have begun infusing ozonated physiologic saline to increase the subsequent blood-flow delivery of vitamin C deep into tumors and increase tumor oxygenation. To sustain the increased tumor oxygenation, during the infusion of vitamin C, we administer supplemental oxygen using a nasal cannula.

Dr. Daniel Thomas, DO, MS
Mount Dora, Florida, USA